Why go to Mass?

Have you ever had people tell you that they think Mass is “boring” or that they don’t really get anyting out of it? Perhaps you have even felt that way at some point in your life.

CCH Epic - MonstranceCheck out this great article: 8 Reasons to Go to Mass.

“If you really thought about who you are, who God is, and how much thanks you owe Him, you would want to go to Mass. The Mass would become the source and center of your spiritual life.” - JAMES STENSON

Feeling Bored at Mass?

Sadly, many Catholics haven’t had the opportunity to really learn what’s happening at Mass… By journeying through the parts of the Mass, we hope you will find new excitement in this joyful and meaningful celebration of our Faith every Sunday (or every day)!

Today’s Bored at Mass feature: The Opening Rites

Okay. You just finished singing the opening hymn and Mass has begun! Together, as a community of believers, everyone makes the sign of the cross. Here is what one of the Early Church Fathers had to say about the power of the sign of the cross:

“By the sign of the cross all magic ceases; all incantations are powerless; every idol is abandoned and deserted; all irrational voluptuousness is quelled; and each one looks up from earth to heaven.” –St. Athanasius (De Incarn. Verbi, t.1)

Did you know that the priest’s greeting to you that follows comes straight out of Scripture? “The grace of the Lord Jesus Christ and the love of God and the fellowship of the Holy Spirit be with you all” (2 Corinthians 13:14). In another greeting, the priest says, “Grace to you and peace from God our Father and the Lord Jesus Christ” (1 Corinthians 1:3). “And also with you!” we reply.

Catholics Come Home Lost & Found Tip: When the priest invokes peace upon you, take a moment to prepare yourself to receive that peace. Ask yourself if you really are in a peaceful state of mind as you begin the Mass. Offer to God anything that may be keeping you from your peacefulness. Chances are, you’ve spent all week waiting for a moment of “peace”—well, now you’ve got it!

To dive deeper into the parts of the Mass, grab “The How-To Book of the Mass” by Michael Dubruiel in our CatholicsComeHome.org bookstore!

Feeling Bored at Mass?

Sadly, many Catholics haven’t had the opportunity to really learn what’s happening at Mass… By journeying through the parts of the Mass, we hope you will find new excitement in this joyful and meaningful celebration of our Faith every Sunday (or every day)!

Today’s Bored at Mass feature: Entering the church

When you enter your church, you are probably used to blessing yourself with holy water while making the sign of the cross. Do you ever think back to your baptism when you do this? If not, you should! Every time you repeat this gesture, you should be reminded of the waters of your baptism and being baptized in the name of the Father, and of the Son, and of the Holy Spirit.

And what’s that thing Catholics do (sometimes quite quickly) right before they sit down? Oh yes, genuflect. We often forget that this small gesture is one of adoration. It helps to “get us focused” on who is present in our midst—in the tabernacle. When we enter the sanctuary, we are in the presence of God!

Catholics Come Home Lost & Found Tip: When you cross yourself with holy water, remember this: You belong to Christ, just as much now as on the day of your baptism! Also, realize the act of adoration you participate in when you genuflect to the tabernacle. You aren’t just touching your knee to the ground for no reason…You are acknowledging the Presence of the Son of God in your midst!

To learn more about the Mass and your Catholic Faith, visit CatholicsComeHome.org.

Bored at Mass?

Sadly, many Catholics haven’t had or taken the opportunity to really learn what’s happening at Mass… By journeying through the parts of the Mass, we hope you will find new excitement in this joyful and meaningful celebration of our Faith every Sunday (or every day)!

Today’s Bored at Mass? feature: The PRE-GAME

In order for us to “make the most” of each Mass, it is important for us to ready our hearts, minds, and bodies prior to walking into church on Sunday.

How to ready our hearts: Take time to reflect before you go to Mass. Think about the desires and intentions of your heart you want to place before Lord that day. Also, prepare your heart to praise Him in all His glory during Mass.

How to ready our minds: Michael Dubruiel, in The How-to Book of the Mass, points out that “Some of us play an intellectual game at Mass of finding fault with the way the Mass is celebrated…But the Mass is not a place for us to sit back like a movie and to find fault; rather, it is a place to encounter Jesus Christ” (page 30).

How to ready our bodies: We should all take the time to examine our thoughts, words, and actions before Mass. Perhaps we’ll find we need go to Confession to get rid of our sins and receive forgiveness before receiving Jesus in the Holy Eucharist.

Lost & Found Tip: The warm-up sets the pace for the game. How we prepare for Mass will help guide our prayer and focus during the Mass. This Sunday, prepare yourself for who you are about to encounter at Mass—Jesus. He’s truly present, so we should want to give Him our best!

4th Day of Christmas Inspiration…From CatholicsComeHome.org

Pope Benedict’s homily at his Christmas Mass calls us to turn away from selfishness, and ‘open the eyes of our hearts, so that we may become vigilant and clear-sighted, in this way bringing you close to others as well!’ – very inspiring!

“…For you the Saviour is born: through the Gospel and those who proclaim it, God now reminds us of the message that the Angel announced to the shepherds. It is a message that cannot leave us indifferent. If it is true, it changes everything. If it is true, it also affects me. Like the shepherds, then, I too must say: Come on, I want to go to Bethlehem to see the Word that has occurred there. The story of the shepherds is included in the Gospel for a reason. They show us the right way to respond to the message that we too have received. What is it that these first witnesses of God’s incarnation have to tell us?

The first thing we are told about the shepherds is that they were on the watch – they could hear the message precisely because they were awake. We must be awake, so that we can hear the message. We must become truly vigilant people. What does this mean? The principal difference between someone dreaming and someone awake is that the dreamer is in a world of his own. His “self” is locked into this dreamworld that is his alone and does not connect him with others. To wake up means to leave that private world of one’s own and to enter the common reality, the truth that alone can unite all people. Conflict and lack of reconciliation in the world stem from the fact that we are locked into our own interests and opinions, into our own little private world. Selfishness, both individual and collective, makes us prisoners of our interests and our desires that stand against the truth and separate us from one another. Awake, the Gospel tells us. Step outside, so as to enter the great communal truth, the communion of the one God. To awake, then, means to develop a receptivity for God: for the silent promptings with which he chooses to guide us; for the many indications of his presence. There are people who describe themselves as “religiously tone deaf”. The gift of a capacity to perceive God seems as if it is withheld from some. And indeed – our way of thinking and acting, the mentality of today’s world, the whole range of our experience is inclined to deaden our receptivity for God, to make us “tone deaf” towards him. And yet in every soul, the desire for God, the capacity to encounter him, is present, whether in a hidden way or overtly. In order to arrive at this vigilance, this awakening to what is essential, we should pray for ourselves and for others, for those who appear “tone deaf” and yet in whom there is a keen desire for God to manifest himself. The great theologian Origen said this: if I had the grace to see as Paul saw, I could even now (during the Liturgy) contemplate a great host of angels (cf. in Lk 23:9). And indeed, in the sacred liturgy, we are surrounded by the angels of God and the saints. The Lord himself is present in our midst. Lord, open the eyes of our hearts, so that we may become vigilant and clear-sighted, in this way bringing you close to others as well!”

Visit www.CatholicsComeHome.org to grow in your faith each day.

Bored at Mass?

Feeling “Bored at Mass?”

Many Catholics haven’t had the opportunity to really learn what’s happening at Mass… By journeying through understanding the parts of the Mass, you will find new excitement in this joyful and meaningful celebration of our Faith every Sunday (or every day)!

Today’s Bored at Mass feature: Where did the Mass come from?

The Mass finds its origins 2,000 years ago, at the Last Supper, when Jesus and His disciples celebrated the Passover meal. “Now as they were eating, Jesus took bread, and blessed, and broke it, and gave it to the disciples and said, ‘Take, eat; this is my body…’” (see Matthew 26:26-28). Jesus reminded the disciples, “Do this in remembrance of me” (1 Corinthians 11: 24, 25). Jesus’ followers then began to celebrate the sacrifice of the Mass, culminating in the Holy Eucharist as Jesus instructed them to do…and the celebration has continued to this day in the Catholic Church.

Read what some of the Early Church Fathers had to say about the Mass.

Catholics Come Home Lost & Found Tip: Next time you go to Mass, remember where it all started—with Jesus, 2,000 years ago. Take time to realize how amazing it is to be able to participate in the sacrificial meal and heavenly banquet…Jesus saves a seat just for you!

Grow in your faith daily at: CatholicsComeHome.org