Solemnity of All Saints and All Souls!

Happy All Saints (today) and All Souls (tomorrow)! On November 1 and 2, the Church celebrates these feasts, remembering the saints in heaven and all the faithful departed.

What are the origins of these feast days? Find out here!

Take a moment today to celebrate the lives of the saints, by learning about them and praying to them. Perhaps you can pick a few saints to focus on with your family today. Then, tomorrow, make sure to take time to pray for your relatives and friends who have passed away and for all the souls in Purgatory.

Happy Feast Day!

Two New U.S. Saints!

As of today, Blessed Kateri Tekakwitha and Blessed Marianne Cope are now Saint Kateri and Saint Marianne!

Read a little about the lives of these holy women of God.

“She reminds us that Jesus came for all people in every age, but especially for the lowly, whom God loves in a special way.” -Archbishop Chaput, speaking about St. Kateri

Saints Kateri and Marianne, pray for us!

From the Holy Father: Moses and Intercessory Prayer

“In fasting, Moses shows he is waiting for the gift of God’s law as a source of life: it will reveals God’s will and nourish the human heart, making him enter into a covenant with the Almighty that the source of life: it is Life itself!”

Read more here!

Can you think of more powerful examples of intercessory prayer in Scripture or in the lives of the saints?

CCH Recommends…

Any Friend of God’s is a Friend of Mine
By Patrick Madrid
The best ever explanation of the Catholic doctrine of the communion of saints written for a popular audience. Patrick Any Friend of God'sMadrid explains in a clear, easy-to-follow style why Catholics pray to and honor Mary and the saints. Using the Bible and the testimony of the early Church Fathers, he provides a concise overview of the biblical and historical foundations of this often misunderstood Catholic doctrine. He also walks you through the standard anti-Catholic arguments against praying to Mary and the saints and demonstrates from the Bible why these arguments are themselves unbiblical.

Get it today from our web store and help support CCH in the process!

Meeting Christ in the Saints

“Devotion to a particular saint always means that the saint in question is held in high personal regard. Not only do we have particular reverence for the saint, but we are spiritually fascinated by his life, works, and virtues. Somehow weSBernard_BR2 are able spiritually to enter into his life: we seem to understand and grasp something of his unique spiritual genius. Not only that, but we want to be influenced by this saint, because the way he lived and practiced virtue on earth is viewed as a thing of compelling beauty.” (Father Michael D Griffin, O.C.D, Saint Joseph – A Theological Introduction)

Which saints do you hold in high personal regard? What about their sainthood most makes them so beautiful to you? Which of their virtues compells you to work toward your own sanctity with more fervor and devotion?

“Ah! from how great bitterness of soul have you often delivered me, O Good Jesus, coming to me!… How often has StAugustineprayer taken me on the brink of despair, and restored me to the state of soul of one exulting in joy and confident forgiveness. Those who are afflicted in this way, behold they know that the Lord Jesus is truly a Physician Who healeth the broken of heart and bindeth up their bruses” (St. Bernard of Clairvaux, Canticles ch.XX)

“Late have I loved you, Beauty so ancient and so new, late have I loved you! Lo, you were within, but I outside, seeking there for you, and upon the shapely things you have made I rushed headlong – I, misshapen. You were with me, but I was not with you. They held me back far from you, those things which would have no being, were they not in you. You called, shouted, broke through my deafness; you flared, blazed, banished my blindness; you lavished your fragrance, I gasped; and now I pant for you; I tasted you, and now I hunger and thirst; you touched me, and I burned for your peace.” (St. Augustine, Confessions X:27)therese

“I have never wished for human glory, contempt it was that had attraction for my heart; but having recognized that this again was too glorious for me, I ardently desire to be forgotten.” (St. Therese of Lisieux)

Happy Feast Day!

In honor of the celebration of the Feast of St. Joseph, here is a great article that talks about St. Joseph: The Silent Figure.

In the article, Fr. William Saunders quotes Pope John Paul II saying, ‘Pope John Paul II in Redemptoris Custos (1989) exhorted the faithful to look to St. Joseph in our troubled age: “This patronage must be invoked, and it is always necessary for the Church, not only to defend it against dangersSt. Joseph ceaselessly cropping up, but also and above all to support it in those fearful efforts at evangelizing the world, and spreading the new evangelization among nations where the Christian religion and life were formerly the most flourishing, but are now put to a difficult test…. May St. Joseph become for all a singular master in the service of the saving mission of Christ that is incumbent on each and every one of us in the Church: To spouses, to parents, to those who live by the work of their hands or by any other work, to persons called to the contemplative life as well as to those called to the apostolate.”‘ ”

St. Joseph, please place our Lenten intentions at the feet of Jesus…and pray for us!

Happy Feast Day from CatholicsComeHome.org!

Feast of Saints Timothy and Titus

Look at the great zeal for the spread of the Gospel we find in these men of the early Church!

Do we pray for the strength and courage to proclaim our faith with the fervor of saints like these?

Some words from St. Paul to Timothy that we too can reflect on today: “For to this end we toil and strive, because we have our hope set on the living God, who is the Savior of all men, especially of those who believe” (1 Tim 4:10).

To learn more about the Bible, the saints and the early Church, visit CatholicsComeHome.org.